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A Detroit ballot processor testified before a Michigan legislative hearing on Thursday that she was intimidated and harassed by supervisors after she refused to backdate absentee ballots and accept others that violated state law on Election Night.

Jessy Jacob, a 34-year Detroit city worker, told a hearing of the state’s Senate Oversight Committee that she was instructed by election officials on the morning of Nov. 4 to enter ballots as received by Nov. 2 knowing they had been received after the 9 p.m. deadline on Nov. 3, Election Day. Her refusal drew reprisals, she said.

”They treated me like a criminal, humiliated me, harassed me,” Jacob said in her witness statement sitting beside Rudy Giuliani and Jenna Ellis, campaign lawyers for President Donald Trump. ”It was so bad.”

The Trump campaign has filed lawsuits contesting election results in several states and is lobbying state legislatures to invoke their authority to select electors to the Electoral College.

At one point, Jacob said she was told by a representative from the Michigan Department of State’s Bureau of Elections, ”I don’t need you here. I don’t need any of your help. Get out of here.

”I couldn’t do anything, because when I am entering the ballot, I couldn’t lie about the date,” Jacob said.

Jacob said that she was processing opened absentee ballots, some of which had no postage stamp and no signature match. Other issues included that some absentee ballots were issued on Nov. 3. The state manual for ballot processors says ballots are invalid if they are issued after 4 p.m. on Nov. 2.

”So it was issued on Nov. 3, Election Day,” she said. ”It was issued, received, everything, on Nov. 3. Then I checked whether that voter is newly registered. No, he was not registered on Nov. 3. He was registered sometime in 2010 — 10 years ago. You are not supposed to issue absentee ballots on election day to already registered voters.”

But when she took her concerns to supervisors, she learned no one else at the facility where she was working was following the process to accept legal ballots.

While expressing her concerns, she was told by Chris Thomas, a contractor for the Detroit City Clerk’s Office and overseeing operations: ”She’s right, but why should we punish voters for a processor’s mistake?”

”I never expected this kind of treatment,” Jacob said. ”It was really, really bad. I had to go through this, so inhumane.”

(Newsmax)

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Donald Trump

Trump Appeals Suspension to Rejoin Facebook, Instagram

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. The decision is expected to take around two and a half months.

Former Danish Prime Minister Helle Thorning-Schmidt, who is a co-chair of the oversight board, told UK’s Channel 4 News that they are currently looking into the appeal concerning Trump’s Facebook and Instagram accounts. The board was set up to be an independent group to hear users’ appeals and is comprised of 19 former politicians, journalists, and academics.

“It’s a very high profile case but that is exactly why the Oversight Board was created in the first place,” Thorning-Schmidt said.

In a statement to The Epoch Times, the board confirmed that “a user statement has been received in the case before the Oversight Board concerning President Trump’s Facebook and Instagram accounts.”

“We will have no further comment concerning that statement until the Board has issued its decision,” they added.

Trump’s office did not immediately respond to The Epoch Times’ request for comment.

Thorning-Schmidt said that the board has 90 days to render a decision, adding that although the members would like to expedite the process, the time frame is necessary to allow for translations and experts to share their opinions.

The board is also reviewing public comments on Trump’s appeal. Thorning-Schmidt said they have already received “thousands” of public comments in this case.

Facebook suspended Trump indefinitely in early January following the breach of the U.S. Capitol. The Silicon Valley company was not the only platform to ban Trump amid a campaign these companies say is to remove harmful content from their platforms. Twitter, Google, Snapchat, Twitch, and other platforms also suspended Trump’s access around the same time.

Facebook CEO Mark Zuckerberg justified his company’s censorship by claiming the risks of Trump using the platform through Inauguration Day were too great.

“We believe the risks of allowing the President to continue to use our service during this period are simply too great. Therefore, we are extending the block we have placed on his Facebook and Instagram accounts indefinitely and for at least the next two weeks until the peaceful transition of power is complete,” Zuckerberg said in a statement at the time.

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On the day that the Capitol was breached as Congress was gathered to certify the results of the 2020 presidential election, Trump made two posts on Facebook that the company found objectionable and removed, publicly citing Trump’s “use of our platform to incite violent insurrection against a democratically elected government.”

In both of the posts, one being a video, Trump told his supporters that “we have to have peace” and told them to “go home.”

Facebook said it removed the two posts for violating its Community Standard on Dangerous Individuals and Organizations under its policy prohibiting praise, support, and representation of events that Facebook designates as “violating.”

Later, after reviewing Trump’s communications outside the platform, Facebook determined to extend the block indefinitely.

Trump said last week that he was looking into options to return to social media including joining an existing platform or creating his own. He has, however, ruled out re-joining Twitter, which he called “very boring” after many conservative users departed from the platform after his permanent ban.

Perceived unbalanced moderation of users’ content by social media companies has raised concerns over First Amendment rights and a lack of checks and balances for decisions made by Big Tech companies.

Congress is looking to hold Big Tech companies accountable for their actions and has been seeking to legislate a new antitrust law. On Thursday, the House Energy and Commerce Committee announced a March 25 hearing with Facebook CEO Mark Zuckerberg, Twitter CEO Jack Dorsey, and Google CEO Sundar Pichai, who will be expected to testify on misinformation on online platforms.

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GOP split over whether to ‘bend the knee’ by visiting Trump at Mar-a-Lago

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Republican lawmakers are split over whether to pay tribute to Donald Trump by visiting the former president at his Mar-a-Lago resort.

Representatives Matt Gaetz (R-FL) and Lauren Boebert (R-CO) are visiting for a Saturday night fundraiser at Mar-a-Lago to help raise money for the 2022 re-election campaign of Sen. Mike Lee (R-UT).

Rep. Steve Scalise (R-LA) met with Trump at Mar-a-Lago on Tuesday and Gov. Ron DeSantis (R-FL) was spotted at Mar-a-Lago on Friday night.
Sen. Lindsey Graham (R-SC) is planning a visit.

But Senate Minority Leader Mitch McConnell (R-KY) won’t be going.

“The Kentucky Republican is ‘not going to bend the knee’ and travel to Mar-a-Lago, a close McConnell associate told CNN, adding that McConnell will ‘probably never speak’ to Trump again if he can avoid it,” CNN reported Saturday.

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“If they don’t figure it out soon, some GOP leaders fear, there could be a major crash ahead. As some see it, that presents the greatest risk for McConnell, who — despite his power in the Senate — isn’t nearly as popular as Trump with Republican voters across the country,” CNN explained.

“It’s a “collision between a tractor-trailer and a Volkswagen,” said one person familiar with both Trump and McConnell’s thinking, emphasizing the damage that Trump and his massive base of loyal supporters are capable of inflicting.”
(Raw story)

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Donald Trump

Trump to speak at CPAC conference in Florida

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Former President Donald Trump will speak at the annual CPAC conference in Orlando, Florida, next week about the future of the Republican Party and the conservative movement.

People familiar with Mr. Trump‘s plans say he will also speak about President Biden’s immigration policies. Mr. Trump has spoken at the conference previously during his presidency when the event was held in Washington.

It will be Mr. Trump‘s first public appearance since leaving office on Jan. 20. Several House and Senate Republicans are urging him to campaign for GOP candidates in the 2022 election cycle.

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The former president’s allies have warned that Mr. Trump will back primary candidates against Republicans who supported his second impeachment.
(Washington Times)

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